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Home > Dental Conditions > Cavities  > Cavities Symptoms & Causes > Soda Drinkers More Prone to Cavities
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Soda Drinkers More Prone to Cavities

 
The sugar in soda is bad for teeth.

Most people are aware that sweetened soda is bad for the teeth. Dentists can usually spot a soda drinker because they are often prone to dental cavities and white spots on their teeth known as decalcifications, which are actually the start of new cavities. A cavity is an infection caused by a combination of carbohydrate-containing foods or beverages and bacteria that live in our mouths. Sweetened soda contains a high amount of sugar, a carbohydrate that can promote cavities. Soda may be even more damaging to the teeth than other sugar containing beverages because it is acidic as well.

Before we eat, the pH in our mouth is about 6.2 to 7.0, which is slightly more acidic than water. When the bacteria in our mouths are exposed to sugar, they metabolize it and produce acid. This exposure to acid causes the pH on the tooth surface to drop. As sugary foods such as candy, sugar-frosted breakfast cereals, ice cream, soda and other carbohydrates are eaten, the pH drops. At a pH of 5.2 to 5.5 or below, the acid begins to dissolve the hard enamel that forms the outer coating of our teeth. Every exposure to these foods allows an acid attack on the teeth for about 20 minutes! As the cavity progresses, it encroaches on the nerve and blood supply of the tooth resulting in a painful toothache!

A study examined the effect of several types of sweetened soda and mineral water on the teeth. Teeth exposed to cola, orange and lime soda had significantly more decalcification than those exposed to mineral water. Of all of the sodas tested, cola caused the most decalcification. Sweetened soda seems to damage teeth in two ways. The soda has a low PH and makes the mouth acidic, and the sugar content promotes tooth decay when it comes into contact with bacteria in the mouth.

The easiest way to prevent cavities is by brushing your teeth at least three times a day, especially after eating or drinking and before bed. Flossing at least once a day is important to remove bacteria laden plaque between your teeth. Reducing the amount and frequency of eating sugary foods and beverages can decrease the risk of forming cavities. If you have to have sweetened soda, it is better to drink it at one sitting than sip it throughout the day. Better yet, drink it through a straw in one sitting, to bypass the teeth altogether. Visiting the dentist at least twice a year is essential for a dental exam and a dental cleanings.

Remember, only a dentist can diagnose your dental problems and offer the right treatment plan for you. If you need a dentist, call us at 1-866-970-0441 to be connected with one today.

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